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Mobula mobular

Mobula mobularis commonly referred to as Devilray, Giant Devil Ray, Giant Devilray, Japanese Devilray, Spinetail Devilray, Spinetail Mobula, Japanese Devilray, Spinetail Devil Ray, Mediterranean mobula. Difficulty in the aquarium: Not suitable for aquarium keeping. Toxicity: Toxic hazard unknown.


Profile

lexID:
13897 
AphiaID:
105858 
Scientific:
Mobula mobular 
German:
Teufelsrochen 
English:
Devilray, Giant Devil Ray, Giant Devilray, Japanese Devilray, Spinetail Devilray, Spinetail Mobula, Japanese Devilray, Spinetail Devil Ray, Mediterranean Mobula 
Category:
Rokker 
Family tree:
Animalia (Kingdom) > Chordata (Phylum) > Elasmobranchii (Class) > Myliobatiformes (Order) > Myliobatidae (Family) > Mobula (Genus) > mobular (Species) 
Initial determination:
(Bonnaterre, ), 1788 
Sea depth:
0 - 700 Meter 
Size:
520 cm - 650 cm 
Weight:
1500 kg 
Temperature:
13,1°C - 29°C 
Difficulty:
Not suitable for aquarium keeping 
Offspring:
Not available as offspring 
Toxicity:
Toxic hazard unknown 
CITES:
Appendix II ((commercial trade possible after a safety assessment by the exporting country)) 
Red List:
Endangered (EN) 
Related species at
Catalog of Life
:
 
More related species
in this lexicon
:
 
Author:
Publisher:
Meerwasser-Lexikon.de
Created:
Last edit:
2021-05-31 13:23:09 

Info

Mobula mobular is a very large, bluish-black devil ray with two white, crescent-shaped spots on the shoulders that appear in juveniles and neonates (which fade in adults), a white underside, often with dark spots, and a prominent white tip on the dorsal fin and a dark inner surface of the mouth.

The fin-like lobes are short with black tips, showing a silvery gray inner surface and a white outer surface behind the eye.

The devil ray has a subterminal mouth below the head, a small dorsal fin with a white tip, and a short, serrated caudal spine located near the base of the very long whip-like tail.

The data on the size of vary, depending on the source, between 520cm and 650cm, it is quite conceivable that one of the English names of Mobula mobular, Japanese devil ray, with the ray Mobula japanica, may have led to confusion and misattribution of data.
This also applies to the depth distribution of the ray, which is said to range from 0 - 700 meters to 0 - 1112 meters (Fishes of Australia).
In any case, the water depth of 1112 meters is documented for Mobula japanica.

It is also unclear whether the tip of the stingray's spine is poisonous or non-toxic, scientific documentation can be found on the web for both statements.

Rays, like other marine animals, are among the victims of plastic pollution in the sea, because they can not distinguish between small pieces of plastic and small plankton and then eat it.

Pictures

Adult


Commonly


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